Colonial Coppers

Connecticut-Created Colonial Coppers

Few coins have as much rustic historical appeal and offer such endless variety as the Connecticut Coppers of 1785 to 1788. These pieces circulated in early America as a medium of exchange used in colonial times, both before the US Mint was eventually established in the 1790s and even for several years thereafter. Meant to […]

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Yellowstone photo book

HOME OF OLD FAITHFUL HOLDS A SURPRISE FOR ALL OF US

By Jim O’Neal: On March 1, 1872, President Grant signed into law “The Act of Dedication,” which established Yellowstone National Park, believed to be the first national park in the world. It is truly an American treasure and within its 3,500 square miles are hundreds of species of birds, mammals, fish and reptiles, along with […]

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Commemorative Coins

The Other Exposition Commemoratives

By Sarah Miller The 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition is very familiar to most numismatists, and the $1, $2 ½, and $50 gold commemoratives created as part of this event remain popular to this day. The first gold commemoratives produced for an exposition, however, were envisioned and struck more than 10 years earlier in 1903 for the […]

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From Pocket Change to Work of Art: Trompe l’oeil and Paper Money

By Sarah Miller: Collectors of American paper money have long appreciated the artistry involved in the carefully engraved and printed designs of U.S. currency. What some collectors may not be as familiar with, however, is the tradition of artists painting paper money as part of their work. Artists such as William Harnett, Victor Dubreuil, Alfred […]

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Gold Fever: Cataloger Picks

By Nathan Shults: When I was a child, one of my favorite action movies was the James Bond classic Goldfinger. The movie’s plot centers on the corrupt businessman Auric Goldfinger and his plan to steal the gold from the bullion depository at Fort Knox. However, the villain’s obsession with precious metal is ended when his […]

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Artistry and Coin Designs

Artistry and Coin Designs

By Sarah Miller: From the earliest beginnings of the US Mint in the 1790s until the early 1900s, designs for American coinage were not typically produced by outside artists. Instead, the images displayed on our nickels, cents, gold coins, and more tended to be produced in a relatively insular manner by a small group of in-house […]

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Petrified Wood

Nature’s Art: The Science Behind Petrified Wood

By Grace Evanko: As a student of Environmental Studies, I cannot stress enough the importance and utility of understanding Earth’s natural processes. Whether noticing striated cirrus clouds (a tell-tale sign of impending rain) or feeling the shift in the wind from the south to the north as summer turns to fall, possessing and seeking out […]

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hollywood

8 Types of Leading Men in Hollywood: American Edition

By Holly Culbreath: The price of success in show business is not always hubris.  Often it is being too closely identified with an onscreen persona.  In the bygone days of studio contract players, typecasting was the order of the day.  Like a deck of cards, every studio had one of each kind in the suit.  […]

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A Symphony of Modern Art, and The Beauty of Its Presentation

By Kathryn Hoogendoorn: Ever a lover of the arts, one of my first stops in each city I visit or move to is the local art museum.  I recently moved back into the Dallas area and my favorite past time has quickly become visiting the Dallas Museum of Art. Their permanent collection is excellent and […]

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Challenges and Coinage in Early America

By Sarah Miller: With the ease of today’s credit or debit cards and a seemingly endless supply of change collecting in our desk drawers and back pockets, it can be difficult to imagine that early Americans once did not have enough coins in circulation to complete the simplest of transactions. However, the lack of circulating coinage […]

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